You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘senior citizen art’ tag.

These are some gelatin block monoprints I’ve made using reference images. For the skull and the cat, I used background textures created with stencils.

I learned gelatin plate printing while developing art workshops for senior citizens with physical and cognitive challenges. It’s easy and fun, and there’s lots of info on the web. I used the resources of gelatin gurus Linda Germain and Sharon Giles.

While experimenting, I found that one of my favorite techniques involves hand-painting monoprints using a reference image. I made a tutorial video to help others try it:

In the video, I didn’t go into detail about building the hinge jig: Basically, I made a little foam core platform so that my paper was flush with the surface of my gel block. Then I taped an additional piece of foam-core on, to align with the top of my printing paper. This functioned as a “masking tape hinge holder.” (Depending on how big the paper is, you’d just line up the hinge-holder with its top, and tape it down.) You can also just use a masking tape hinge and skip all the foam core fuss—whatever works!

Of course you need a GEL PLATE RECIPE Gel Plate Recipe Steps (PDF)
(Again, thanks to Linda and Sharon for their resources. They really know this stuff.)

Below are steps for a rest-home art project using a simple image. I practiced with an image I found on the web (sorry I couldn’t locate its original source to credit). Click on the first image to arrow through.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

14115518_1264753350216057_3459441794518194381_o

When I saw this Kandinsky inspired color study project is popular among primary school teachers, I couldn’t wait to try it with senior citizens. I had no idea if they’d enjoy it, or think it was too abstract, but they loved it, and everyone had a great time. It was exactly the right level of challenge for a 1-hour workshop with a mixture of seniors with varying abilities and challenges.

I find that the seniors I’m working with are more inclined to participate and seem to be less beset with self-doubt if there is some type of structure, and this activity had a nice, clear concept that was easy for people to engage with. Once they get going, the work can evolve and be open-ended. There’s never a wrong choice!

I used:

  • Acrylic paint in 3 primary colors (magenta/red, blue, yellow)
  • 30 3×3″ mini canvas boards purchased at Michaels with a coupon
  • 1 18x 24″ black canvas (Also from Michaels. I think they were on sale, 2 for $8)
  • Double sided heavy duty carpet tape
  • (smocks, water cups, paper towels, paper plate palettes, medium-sized acrylic brushes)

I provided an example of one canvas already painted, so they could visualize the idea. (I was careful not to make it too perfect!)

I had each painter choose 2 primary colors. Then I asked them to 1. Paint a dot in the middle of the page with one color; 2. Add a circle around that dot in the second color; 3. Mix the two to make a third color; 4. Continue alternating until they had covered the whole canvas.

For some, painting one 3×3″ canvas was enough of a challenge to take the whole hour. Others churned out several, and had fun experimenting with color mixing.

The best part was that I was able to quickly mount their mini canvases on a big black canvas, so they could see that the imperfections and uniquenesses of their individual paintings added to the interest of the overall piece. (Hot glue would have worked to stick the canvases down, but I used some heavy duty carpet tape I happened to have handy.)

 

14053772_1264761393548586_4323722850658217091_o

NOTE: This is a free blog that WordPress monetizes through ad sales. They sell ads to people I DO NOT endorse, support or condone.

Save

IMG_1315

This was my second 1-hour painting activity at a senior care facility.

Last time we used medium-sized brushes and acrylic paint to color pre-prepped tulip drawings on canvases, so this time I wanted to try something more free, with bigger brushes. I wanted to encourage the painters to really go wild with their brush strokes so I modified a project I’d found that uses adhesive vinyl letters to spell words, which you paint over, then peel off, so that the letter remains white.

Supplies: (Cost for 12-16 participants was ~$25, but I already had paint and boards)

  • 1 50-sheet pad of 11×14″ acrylic paper (doesn’t warp or wrinkle when you paint on it.)
  • 3 packs of cheap adhesive vinyl letters (I got 3″ vinyl letters at Walmart near the mailboxes. Make sure they’re die-cut in the shapes of the letters, not just printed on square sheets.)
  • A roll of painter tape.
  • A tube each of red, yellow, blue and white acrylic paint.
  • Art boards (to tape the paper sheets on. I re-used 12×18″ plasti-core sheets, but cardboard or any conveniently sized stiff material would work)

Faced with a short class time, here’s the prep I did:

  • Cut the 11×14″ paper sheets in half to 5.5″ x 14″ sheets
  • Tape the four edges of the paper down to art boards, overlapping the tape about 1/4″ onto the paper along each edge.
  • Create an example
  • Sort through the letters before class and put letters for words (we did LIVE, LOVE and LAUGH) on wax paper to temporarily hold them.
    (I got more mileage out of my letter sets by using an Exacto knife to make extra As into Vs, which we needed more of.)

With help from rest home activities staff, I gathered

  • portable table easels ($8 ea. online)*
  • smocks
  • water cups (We used urine sample cups! ha ha)
  • paper towels
  • paper plates as palettes
  • 1/2″ to 1″ size acrylic brushes.**
  • A blow dryer to speed drying time

*You could do without easels, but I think they help to prevent people from dragging their arm across the wet painting. **Acrylic brushes have stiffer bristles than watercolor brushes, making it easier to control acrylic paint, which is thicker than watercolor. It can be frustrating to paint with brushes that are too floppy, too ragged, too big, or too small for a particular project.)

How it went:

  • Helpers handed out easels, brushes, water cups, paper towels and art boards.
  • We asked painters to select a word, and they placed the letters according to their taste.
  • I showed my example and explained that we would 1) use big brush strokes of different colors. 2) fill in the whole area with paint. 3) paint right over the black letters 4) later we’d peel the letters off.
  • We passed out palettes and painters picked 2 primaries of their choice and white.
    (i.e. either red and yellow, red and blue, or blue and yellow, plus white)
  • I demonstrated how loosely you can paint, and how it was fine if wet colors mixed.

IMG_1303

It took the group the full hour to get their whole 5.5 x 14″ sheet painted. I encouraged painters to mix any colors they liked and to keep going until they covered all the white within the blue tape. I also reminded them to dip their brush in water to make the paint spread easier. (“Yes! You’re doing it right!” “Yup! Paint right over the letters.” “Would you like to add another color?” etc.)

After the first person’s painting was complete, I dried it a bit with the blow dryer and returned the painting so the painter could pull off the vinyl letters. For some painters, I started the corners of the adhesive. Everyone was surprised and delighted with the effect.

All of the painters really enjoyed removing the adhesive letters and masking tape to reveal their finished work. Nobody complained that theirs turned out badly! It was a lot of fun. You could modify this project to ask people to think of inspiring words ahead of time and use their own words. You could also do a short phrase on a canvas, as shown in blog posts that inspired me to try this activity. Sponge painting, spatter painting, spray painting, cotton ball painting, etc. would work just as well.

Their finished works can be displayed individually or in groups.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Save

Save

Save

%d bloggers like this: